SHIRLEY CHISHOLM

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From Biography.com

Representing the 12th district of New York, Shirley Chisholm became the first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1969. While in office, Chisholm fought for the same issues that she had been passionate about as a community activist: children's education and welfare, a guaranteed minimum income to help the poor, immigration rights and women's rights

Chisholm did not see herself as a skilled legislator; rather, she believed her function in Congress was to be a trailblazer who could build coalitions to bring about the change she, and her constituents, wanted. True to her goals, she helped establish the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) in 1971 before becoming the first black person from a major party to make a run for the White House the following year.

After her failed bid for the presidency, Chisholm continued her work in Congress, establishing a lot of new ground along the way. In 1977, she co-founded the Congressional Women's Caucus. After leaving Congress in 1983, Chisholm co-founded the National Political Congress of Black Women.

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