IDA B. WELLS

download-1.jpg

Ida B. Wells was an African-American journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, sociologist, feminist, and an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement. 

In the 1890’s Ida led an anti-lynching crusade with her work as a journalist. She wrote as a columnist for various Black publications detailing her experiences as a Black woman in the South, before owning and publishing two magazines of her own: ‘Memphis Free Speech’ and ‘Headlight’  She also worked as a teacher and ended up losing this position for her vocal criticism of the condition of Black schools in the city. After a few incidents of race-related murders involving local business owners and friends of hers, she decided to focus her writing fully on the injustice of white on Black murder, despite receiving death threats.

She lectured abroad to find further support from open-minded white people and took her complaints to the White House in an effort to spark legal reform to protect Black people from lynching. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, or better known as the NAACP in 1909. She also founded several more civil rights organizations to help women, children and people of color and continued to write and protest until her death in 1931. 

HAGS PodcastComment