THE GRIMKE SISTERS

ANGELINA AND SARAH GRIMKE

Early 19th century upper class American Southerners were not exactly known for their abolitionist tendencies. In fact, Sarah and Angelina Grimke were apparently the only members of the Southern elite (male or female) who actively rejected the spoils of Plantation life to fight for justice and equality. Shocking and also, YOU GO, SISTERS. The Grimke sisters literally grew ip in the heart of Dixie, but rebelled against their slave-holding family - including their father, chief judge of the Supreme Court of South Carolina, Judge John Faucheraud Grimke who owned hundreds of slaves, and was a strong advocate for slavery. But his daughters said THANKS NO THANKS to literally everything he stood for, first secretly teaching slave children to read (which was illegal), then peacing out to Philadelphia to fight for equality. 

Protesting was no easy task in the early 1800s and the sisters were vehemently attacked fro making speeches to mixed gendered crowds - a big no-no at the time - to which they said WHATEVER and went on a speaking tour throughout Massachusetts, eventually making even MORE history when Angelina Grimke presented an antislavery petition to Massachusetts lawmakers and became the first woman to speak before a legislative committee. Sarah simultaneously published Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and the Condition of Woman which predated other feminist theories by decades. Both sisters went on to fight vehemently against slavery, for women’s rights, and for racial equality well into their late 70s. GRIMKE SISTERS FOR THE WIN. 

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